What’s a Polycrisis and Why Is Everybody Talking About it? · Madam Money®

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What happened Global leaders and decision makers have gathered again at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland to talk about the most urgent challenges we face. This year, the word “polycrisis” is on everyone’s lips. “The collective vocabularies stored in the world’s great dictionaries did not appear to hold a single world to sum up all this strife,” explained a World Economic Forum blog. “So here’s a new one: Polycrisis.” So what The thinking behind the new word is that there are a number of interconnected negative events that could hit at the same time. Those events could compound in such a way that the impact is much greater than the sum of its parts. For example, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine played a part in the sky-high food and energy costs we saw last year. In some countries, this has fueled social unrest. In the coming decades we may see more of these types of disruptions, with even more serious consequences. When the world’s leaders feel the need to coin new phrases to describe impending doom, it is worth taking notice. But at the same time, you’d be forgiven for feeling tired of ever more dramatic warnings about the future. After all, we’ve been struggling with an unprecedented global health crisis for the past few years, and many Americans have spent recent months preparing for a potential recession. Now what What matters is how you react to potential crises, not what they’re called . Try not to panic about what might be in the future, and instead focus on the things you can control, such as strengthening your financial bases and building wealth. For example, if you don’t have three to six months’ worth of living expenses socked away in a savings account, make this a priority. If you carry high interest debt, make a debt repayment plan. You might not be able to solve everything overnight, but every step you take will mean you’re more prepared. It can also be easy to think that there’s no point in investing for the future because so many things can go wrong. Sure, there are no guarantees. But historically, long-term stock market investments have not only beaten inflation, they’ve also produced decent returns. Consistent investing is a tried and tested way to build wealth. Constant doom mongering also brings a temptation to try to time the market and only buy equities when they hit their absolute lowest. The trouble? It’s impossible to know what the bottom is. If you’re investing with a long-term horizon — say 10 or 20 years — the exact day you buy becomes less important. Open a brokerage account and look for ways to build a portfolio of quality assets that you believe will do well over time. Alert: highest cash back card we’ve seen now has 0% intro APR until 2024 If you’re using the wrong credit or debit card, it could be costing you serious money. Our expert loves this top pick, which features a 0% intro APR until 2024, an insane cash back rate of up to 5%, and all somehow for no annual fee. In fact, this card is so good that our expert even uses it personally. Click here to read our full review for free and apply in just 2 minutes. Read our free review We’re firm believers in the Golden Rule, which is why editorial opinions are ours alone and have not been previously reviewed, approved, or endorsed by included advertisers.
The Ascent does not cover all offers on the market. Editorial content from The Ascent is separate from The Motley Fool editorial content and is created by a different analyst team. Emma Newbery has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Image source: Getty Images

What happened

Global leaders and decision makers have gathered again at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland to talk about the most urgent challenges we face. This year, the word “polycrisis” is on everyone’s lips. “The collective vocabularies stored in the world’s great dictionaries did not appear to hold a single world to sum up all this strife,” explained a World Economic Forum blog. “So here’s a new one: Polycrisis.”

So what

The thinking behind the new word is that there are a number of interconnected negative events that could hit at the same time. Those events could compound in such a way that the impact is much greater than the sum of its parts. For example, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine played a part in the sky-high food and energy costs we saw last year. In some countries, this has fueled social unrest. In the coming decades we may see more of these types of disruptions, with even more serious consequences.

When the world’s leaders feel the need to coin new phrases to describe impending doom, it is worth taking notice. But at the same time, you’d be forgiven for feeling tired of ever more dramatic warnings about the future. After all, we’ve been struggling with an unprecedented global health crisis for the past few years, and many Americans have spent recent months preparing for a potential recession.

Now what

What matters is how you react to potential crises, not what they’re called. Try not to panic about what might be in the future, and instead focus on the things you can control, such as strengthening your financial bases and building wealth.

For example, if you don’t have three to six months’ worth of living expenses socked away in a savings account, make this a priority. If you carry high interest debt, make a debt repayment plan. You might not be able to solve everything overnight, but every step you take will mean you’re more prepared.

It can also be easy to think that there’s no point in investing for the future because so many things can go wrong. Sure, there are no guarantees. But historically, long-term stock market investments have not only beaten inflation, they’ve also produced decent returns. Consistent investing is a tried and tested way to build wealth.

Constant doom mongering also brings a temptation to try to time the market and only buy equities when they hit their absolute lowest. The trouble? It’s impossible to know what the bottom is. If you’re investing with a long-term horizon — say 10 or 20 years — the exact day you buy becomes less important. Open a brokerage account and look for ways to build a portfolio of quality assets that you believe will do well over time.

Alert: highest cash back card we’ve seen now has 0% intro APR until 2024

If you’re using the wrong credit or debit card, it could be costing you serious money. Our expert loves this top pickwhich features a 0% intro APR until 2024, an insane cash back rate of up to 5%, and all somehow for no annual fee.

In fact, this card is so good that our expert even uses it personally. Click here to read our full review for free and apply in just 2 minutes.

Read our free review

We’re firm believers in the Golden Rule, which is why editorial opinions are ours alone and have not been previously reviewed, approved, or endorsed by included advertisers.
The Ascent does not cover all offers on the market. Editorial content from The Ascent is separate from The Motley Fool editorial content and is created by a different analyst team.Emma Newbery has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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